Australia & Oceania

Charlotte Webby defends NZ open water swimming title

First National open water championship with FINA new rules (wetsuits). Reliable source says that protest by swimmer without suit is denied. However the protest should be correct because no suits have been approved (as yet!). 

Swimming with wetsuits changes the sport so dramatically that it would no more be the same sport. OpenWaterSwimming.eu expresses the need to revise these rules to two separate classes: with and without wetsuits. To some swimmers in traditional attire wet-suits are no less than cheating!

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Taranaki swimmer Charlotte Webby retained her title at the New Zealand Open Water Championships in Taupo.

Webby claimed victory in the women's 10km championship while Swimming New Zealand high performance squad member Matthew Scott (Enterprise, Gisborne) took out the men's title on Saturday.

The championships were the first step for swimmers who hope to qualify for the FINA world championships and World University Games later this year, with the top five now heading to the second stage of qualifying at the Australian Open later this month.

Stockton/Newcastle harbour swim cancelled indefinitely

AUSTRALIA Day’s traditional Newcastle harbour swim may never return to the water after organisers were forced to cancel this year’s event. 

Stockton Surf Life Saving Club announced this week they would not hold the event in 2017, only the second time club president and life member Trevor Upton remembers the event not proceeding.

The club issued a statement this week saying “increased marine activity” made it difficult to keep competitors safe during the open water swim.

How the survivor of a boat accident that killed her family will conquer her fear

Susan Berg has spent 30 years fiercely avoiding her three biggest fears: open water, boats and sharks. In heatwaves and on long summer afternoons, there have been no swimming pool dips, relaxed beach swims and lake trips for the Melburnian, with tragic reason.

At 15, she became the sole survivor of a catastrophic boating accident that claimed the lives of three members of her family.

Port to Pub swim: Olympian Jarrod Poort to tackle 25km swim in 2017

OLYMPIC swimmer Jarrod Poort has announced he will take part in the 2017 Hotel Rottnest Port to Pub swim next year.

The dual Olympian, who is currently Australia’s best open water swimmer, announced today he would take on the 25km ultra-marathon swim.

Chloe McCardel’s 20th Channel crossing takes record from Des Renford

Marathon swimmer Chloe McCardel battled a sea storm and some of the biggest waves of her career to complete a 20th crossing of the English Channel yesterday, overtaking Des Renford’s record for the most successful crossings by an Australian.

McCardel, 31, set off from Dover at 3am Saturday (1pm Saturday AEDT) expecting a sea state of force one or two but a storm whipped up and she had to contend with two-metre swells for more than 10 hours.

Crocodile sightings force cancellation of open water swim in Australia

TOWNSVILLE, Australia -- An eight-kilometer open water swimming event between a popular north Queensland island and the city of Townsville has been canceled due to crocodile sightings.

read the full article @ ESPN

North Bondi Roughwater ocean swim has closest finish ever as thousands compete despite poor weather

OLLIE Signorini beat more than 1000 competitors to the finish line in treacherous conditions at the North Bondi Roughwater open water swim on Sunday.

The Collaroy-based swimmer won the 1km event, in what organisers called the ‘closest finish in race history’.

Signorini, who also won the 2014 swim, finished the race in 12:08, shaving more than three minutes off his time last year.

interview with Chloë McCardel

Chloë McCardel swam 126km within two days, solo and unassisted in open water to etch her name in aquatic sports history

On a balmy night on October 22, in the dark tropical waters of the Bahamas, the 29-year-old Australian swimmer made her last few strokes to enter Nassau, the capital of the common wealth of the Bahamas. In doing so, Chloë McCardel became the first person in the world to do the longest, solo, nonstop, unassisted marathon swim in ocean water.

She swam 126 km across Exuma Sound (a body of water in the Bahamas) in the Atlantic ocean from South Eleuthera Island to Nassau in under 42 hours.

David Barra and Brianne Yeats, members of Marathon Swimmers Federation (MSF), the world’s largest community of long-distance swimmers observed her swim. According to their comprehensive report, Chloë has set a world record.

In one of her first interviews since her feat, Chloë talked to The Outdoor Journal about her swim, her belief in swimming sans protective gear and what keeps her going.

Why did you choose the Bahamas as your record-breaking course?

Melbourne swimmer sets record for open water swimming in Bahamas

A Melbourne ultra-marathon swimmer has set a record for open water swimming, in a 42.5 hour journey between two islands in the Bahamas.

Chloe McCardel, 29, swam 126 kilometres unassisted from Lighthouse Beach on the southern tip of Eleuthera Island to Nassau.

If her record is ratified, Ms McCardel will have completed the longest open water, solo, continuous, unassisted marathon swim in history.

She completed the swim wearing only regulation bathers, a swimming cap and goggles.

Local media and supporters welcomed the exhausted swimmer into Nassau.

Australian Cyril Baldock, 70, becomes oldest person to swim English Channel

SEVENTY-YEAR-OLD Australian Cyril Baldock has become the oldest person to swim across the English Channel.

The life member of Sydney’s Bondi Surf Club set off from England early Wednesday morning local time and arrived at Cap Gris Nez in France about 12 hours and 45 minutes later.

“I made it!” Baldock tweeted immediately after completing the 34 km marathon.

“I’m officially the oldest person to swim the English Channel.” Baldock, aged 70 years and nine months, has replaced Englishman Roger Allsopp in the record books.

Allsopp was 70 years and four months when he took almost 18 hours to cross the Channel in 2011.

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